Tooth Extractions

Tooth Extractions Coral Gables, FL

Permanent natural teeth are meant to last a lifetime period, However there are a number of reasons why tooth extraction may be needed. A very common reason involves: A tooth badly damaged or infected , A crowded mouth, functional reason (orthodontia), preventive reasons or just cosmetic purposes.

In any case, Dr. Peggy Alvarez together with the oral surgeon provides a tooth extraction procedure with minimum discomfort thanks to advanced techniques, tools, and anesthesia applied in the practice. Also the entire dental team, works hard to deliver you a pleasant, comfortable overall experience each time you visit our office. To learn more about our painless tooth extraction, we welcome you to contact us today at (305) 548-8690. We are committed to restoring your overall smile’s health.

Tooth Extraction

A dental extraction (also referred to as tooth extraction, exodontia, exodontics, or informally, tooth pulling) is the removal of a tooth from its socket in the bone.

Extractions are performed for a wide variety of reasons, but most commonly to remove teeth which have become unrestorable through tooth decay, periodontal disease or dental trauma, especially when they are associated with toothache. They may also be removed to make room for other teeth or an orthodontia treatment.

Types of Tooth Extractions

There are two types of extractions:

A simple extraction: this procedure is on a tooth that can be seen in the mouth. For a simple extraction, the dentist loosens the tooth with an instrument called an elevator. Then the dentist uses forceps to remove the tooth.

A surgical extraction: this is a more complex procedure, which is used if a tooth may have broken off at the gum line or has not erupted in the mouth. The oral surgeon will make a small incision into your gum to surgically remove the broken tooth or impacted wisdom tooth.

Description Of A Tooth Extraction

Before an extraction, Dr. Peggy will will take the patient's medical history, noting allergies and prescription medications. A dental history is also taken, with particular attention to previous extractions and reactions to anesthetics. Dr. Peggy may then prescribe antibiotics or recommend stopping certain medications prior to the extraction. The tooth is x-rayed to determine its full shape and position, especially if it is impacted.

Tooth extraction can be performed with local anesthesia if the tooth is exposed and appears to be easily removable in one-piece. An instrument called an elevator is used to loosen (luxate) the tooth, widen the space in the bone, and break the tiny elastic fibers that attach the tooth to the bone. Once the tooth is dislocated from the bone, it can be lifted and removed with forceps.

The patient should not eat or drink anything for at least six hours before the procedure. Arrangements should be made for a friend or relative to drive the patient home after the surgery.

After Extraction Care

After an extraction, you'll be asked to bite on a piece of gauze for 20 to 30 minutes. This pressure will allow the blood to clot. You will still have a small amount of bleeding for the next 24 hours or so. It should taper off after that. Don't disturb the clot that forms on the wound.

You can put ice packs on your face to reduce swelling. Typically, they are left on for 20 minutes at a time and removed for 20 minutes. If your jaw is sore and stiff after the swelling goes away, try warm compresses.

Eat soft and cool foods for a few days. Then try other food as you feel comfortable. A gentle rinse with warm salt water, started 24 hours after the surgery, can help to keep the area clean. Use one-half teaspoon of salt in a cup of water. Most swelling and bleeding end within a day or two after the surgery. Initial healing takes at least two weeks.

If you need stitches, Dr. Peggy may use the kind that dissolve on their own. This usually takes one to two weeks. Rinsing with warm salt water will help the stitches to dissolve. Some stitches need to be removed by Dr. Peggy or a surgeon.